Current Visiting Fellows

Adeline Allen

  • 2017-18 James Madison Program Visiting Fellow, Assistant Professor of Law, Trinity Law School

Adeline A. Allen, 2017–18 James Madison Program Visiting Fellow, is Assistant Professor at Trinity Law School, where she has been a member of the faculty since 2012. She teaches Contract and Tort law. Her current research interest focuses on the improper application of the principle of freedom of contract in consent-based commercial gestational surrogacy arrangements. She has published in the areas of defamation and tech law as well as the relationship of Internet statutory protection and sharing-economy platforms. She received a B.S. in anthropology from University of California, Los Angeles, and a J.D. from Regent University School of Law.

Antón Barba-Kay

  • 2017-18 James Madison Program Visiting Fellow; Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Catholic University of America

Antón Barba-Kay, 2017-18 James Madison Program Visiting Fellow, is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at The Catholic University of America, in Washington, DC. The bulk of his current research concentrates on politics and aesthetics in nineteenth century German philosophy. His current project is to understand what difference the Internet makes to contemporary American politics. He earned a B.A. from St. John’s College (Annapolis), a B.A. in Classics from the University of Cambridge, and, in 2013, a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago’s Committee on Social Thought, with a dissertation on Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit.

Keegan Callanan

  • 2017-18 James Madison Program Visiting Fellow; Assistant Professor of Political Science, Middlebury College

Keegan Callanan, 2017-18 James Madison Program Visiting Fellow, is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Middlebury College, where he has teaching responsibilities in the history of political philosophy and contemporary political theory.  His primary research is in modern political thought, and he is currently completing a book manuscript on the political philosophy of Montesquieu, tentatively entitled, Montesquieu’s Liberalism and the Problem of Universal Politics.  His work has appeared in journals such as History of Political Thought and Political Research Quarterly. A graduate of Bowdoin College, Professor Callanan received his M.A. and Ph.D. from Duke University.  Prior to his appointment at Middlebury, he taught at the University of Virginia as a Post-doctoral Fellow in the Department of Politics.

Allen C. Guelzo

  • 2017-18 James Madison Program Garwood Visiting Professor and Visiting Fellow; Henry R. Luce Professor of the Civil War Era and Director, Civil War Era Studies, Gettysburg College

Allen C. Guelzo, 2017-18 James Madison Program Garwood Visiting Professor and Visiting Fellow, is Director of Civil War Era Studies and Professor of History at Gettysburg College in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.  He is the author of Abraham Lincoln: Redeemer President (Wm. Eerdmans, 1999), which won both the Lincoln Prize and the Abraham Lincoln Institute Prize in 2000; Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation: The End of Slavery in America (Simon & Schuster, 2004), which also won the Lincoln Prize and the Abraham Lincoln Institute Prize, for 2005; Lincoln and Douglas: The Debates That Defined America (Simon & Schuster, 2008), on the Lincoln-Douglas debates of 1858; Abraham Lincoln as a Man of Ideas (Southern Illinois University Press, 2009) a volume of essays which won a Certificate of Merit from the Illinois State Historical Association in 2010; and Lincoln: A Very Short Introduction (in the Oxford University Press ‘Very Short Introductions’ series). In 2012, he published Fateful Lightning: A New History of the Civil War and Reconstruction with Oxford University Press, and in 2013 Knopf published his book on the battle of Gettysburg (for the 150th anniversary of the battle), Gettysburg: The Last Invasion, which spent eight weeks on the New York Times best-seller list and again winning the Lincoln Prize. He is one of Power Line’s 100 “Top Professors” in America.  He has written for the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Christian Science Monitor, First Things, U.S. News & World Report, National Review, the Daily Beast, the Claremont Review of Books and Books and Culture, and has been featured on NPR’s “Weekend Edition Sunday,” The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, and Brian Lamb’s “Booknotes.” Together with Patrick Allitt and Gary W. Gallagher, he team-taught The Teaching Company’s new edition of its American History series, as well as courses on DVD on Abraham Lincoln, American intellectual history ("The American Mind"), and the American Revolution. From 2006 to 2013, he served as a member of the National Council of the National Endowment for the Humanities.  In 2002-03 he was a Visiting Fellow in the James Madison Program in American Ideals and institutions at Princeton University, and returned in 2010-11 as the Madison Program’s Garwood Visiting Fellow and Garwood Visiting Professor in Politics. He was born in Yokohama, Japan, and holds an M.A. and Ph.D. in History from the University of Pennsylvania.

Boleslaw Z. Kabala

  • 2017-18 James Madison Program Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate

Boleslaw Z. Kabala, 2017-18 James Madison Program Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate, is working on judicial politics during his Fellowship year at the James Madison Program. Are there competing interpretations of Marbury vs. Madison, the landmark Supreme Court case that formally established judicial review? If so, do any of them stand in need of revision today?  Dr. Kabala's dissertation at Yale suggested a new path in the comparison of two important thinkers, Hobbes and Spinoza, through a focus on theological politics. It significantly broadened his early interests in Hobbes and Spinoza, which culminated in a senior thesis at Harvard. Dr. Kabala also has experience in government, having served as a Deputy Press Secretary in Governor Haley Barbour’s administration in Mississippi from 2004-2005. He hopes to utilize his academic and political experience in the research on judicial politics. Originally from Poland and a naturalized US citizen, he is a United States Presidential Scholar. He graduated from Groton, received his A.B. from Harvard University, and received his M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Yale University. 

Kitch professional headshot

Sarah Beth V. Kitch

  • 2016-17 James Madison Program Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate, Princeton University
Whelan Hall, 16 Stockton Street, Princeton, NJ 08540
609-258-7121

Sarah Beth V. Kitch is the 2016-17 James Madison Program Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate. She holds an M.A. and a Ph.D. in political science from Louisiana State University. In 2008, she was an Associate Student and a Visiting Student at Oxford University, and completed her B.A. in Communication at Southeastern Louisiana University. At Louisiana State University she taught courses in political theory, political theology, American government, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Her dissertation was entitled, Accountable Actors: Politics and Poetic Imagination in Huxley, Lewis, and Orwell. Her current research focuses on Martin Luther King, Jr.’s political theology. She traces King’s participation in the prophetic tradition and his understanding of the relationship between love and justice in politics.

Thomas W. Merrill

  • Fall 2017 James Madison Program Visiting Fellow; Associate Professor and Interim Chair of the Department of Government, School of Public Affairs, American University

Thomas W. Merrill, Fall 2017 James Madison Program Visiting Fellow, is Associate Professor, Chair of the Department of Government, and Associate Director of the Political Theory Institute, all in the School of Public Affairs at American University.  He is the author of Hume and the Politics of Enlightenment (Cambridge, 2015), which won the Delba Winthrop Prize for Best Recent Work in Political Philosophy, and articles in the Review of PoliticsPolity, and Perspectives on Political Science. He is also a coeditor of Apples of Gold in Pictures in Silver: Honoring the Work of Leon R. Kass (Lexington, 2010) and Human Dignity and Bioethics (Notre Dame, 2009). He was a research analyst with the President’s Council on Bioethics from 2007 to 2009. In 2011-12 he was the Forbes Visiting Fellow in the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions at Princeton University.  He received his B.A. from the University of Chicago and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Duke University.

Sarah Morgan Smith Professional Headshot

Sarah A. Morgan Smith

  • 2016-17 James Madison Program Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate
Whelan Hall, 16 Stockton Street, Princeton, NJ 08540
609-258-7117

Sarah Morgan Smith is the 2016-17 James Madison Program Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate. Her teaching and research focus on the intersection of religion and politics in American history, with an emphasis on questions of civic formation in sustaining political commitments. Drawing on her years in the field of public history and civic education, she is also deeply interested in the use of material culture and visual culture as sources for understanding the development of American political thought. She serves as the co-director of the Religion in American History project housed in the Ashbrook Center at Ashland University. She received her B.A. in history from Grove City College in 2001, her M.A. in American History and Government from Ashland University in 2009, and her Ph.D. in Political Science from Rutgers University in 2016.

Mark L. Movsesian

  • Spring 2018 James Madison Program Visiting Fellow; Frederick A. Whitney Professor of Contract Law, Director of the Center for Law and Religion, St. John’s University

Mark L. Movsesian, Spring 2018 James Madison Program Visiting Fellow, is the Frederick A. Whitney Professor and Director of the Center for Law and Religion at St. John’s University. His articles have appeared in the HarvardNorth CarolinaNotre Dame, and Washington & Lee Law Reviews, the Oxford Journal of Law and Religion, the American Journal of International Law, the Harvard International Law Journal, the Virginia Journal of International Law, and many others.  He has been a visiting professor at Notre Dame and Cardozo Law Schools and has delivered papers at numerous workshops in the United States and Europe. In law school, he was an editor of the Harvard Law Review and a recipient of the Sears Prize, awarded to the two highest-ranking students in the second-year class.  He clerked for Justice David H. Souter of the Supreme Court of the United States and served as an attorney-advisor in the Office of Legal Counsel at the United States Department of Justice. Professor Movsesian graduated summa cum laude from Harvard College and magna cum laude from Harvard Law School.

Deborah O’Malley

  • 2017-18 James Madison Program Forbes Postdoctoral Research Associate

Deborah O’Malley is a 2017-18 James Madison Program Forbes Postdoctoral Research Associate. Her research explores the source and scope of the rights of religious institutions in the American legal tradition. Prior to studying at Baylor, she spent several years providing research for various non-profit organizations in Washington, D.C., including the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty. She has participated in fellowships with the Claremont Institute; the John Jay Institute; the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace & World Affairs; and the Ethics and Public Policy Center’s Tertio Millennio Seminar on the Free Society in Krakow, Poland. She holds a Ph.D and an M.A. in Political Science from Baylor University, and a B.A. in Philosophy and Political Science from Ashland University.

Michael Stokes Paulsen

  • Spring 2018 James Madison Program Garwood Visiting Fellow and Visiting Professor in Politics; Distinguished University Chair and Professor of Law, University of St. Thomas School of Law

Michael Stokes Paulsen, Spring 2018 James Madison Program Garwood Visiting Fellow and Visiting Professor in Politics, is Distinguished University Chair & Professor of Law at the University of St. Thomas, where he has taught since 2007.  Professor Paulsen was previously the McKnight Presidential Professor of Law & Public Policy and Associate Dean at the University of Minnesota Law School, where he taught from 1991-2007.   He is a graduate of Northwestern University and Yale Law School and has served as a federal prosecutor, as Attorney-Advisor in the Office of Legal Counsel of the U.S. Department of Justice, and as counsel for the Center for Law & Religious Freedom.  Professor Paulsen is the author of more than ninety scholarly articles and book chapters on a wide variety of constitutional law topics.  He is co-author, with Luke Paulsen, of The Constitution: An Introduction (Basic Books, 2015).  Professor Paulsen is also co-author of the casebook The Constitution of the United States, (with Steve Calabresi, Michael McConnell, Samuel Bray, and Will Baude, Foundation Press, 3d ed. 2017) and Editor of Our Constitution: Landmark Interpretations of America’s Governing Document (The Federalist Society 2013).

Nathan Pinkoski

  • 2017-18 James Madison Program Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate

Nathan Pinkoski is 2017-18 James Madison Program Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate. His research interests focus on the interpretation of classical political thought in 20th century political thought. His D.Phil. dissertation was on the interpretation of Aristotle in the thought of Hannah Arendt, Leo Strauss, and Alasdair MacIntyre. He also works on early modern Latin, and is preparing translations of some Latin texts of Francis Bacon and John Locke. Presently, he serves as the assistant director for the Centre for Aristotelian Studies in Ethics and Politics (CASEP), and an editor for Politics and Poetics academic journal. He holds a B.A. (Honours) in Political Science and Philosophy from the University of Alberta, Canada, and an M.Phil. and a D.Phil. in Political Theory from the University of Oxford.

Andrew Porwancher

  • Spring 2018 James Madison Program Garwood Visiting Fellow; Assistant Professor of Classics & Letters, University of Oklahoma

Andrew Porwancher, Spring 2018 James Madison Program Garwood Visiting Fellow, is the Wick Cary Associate Professor of Classics & Letters at the University of Oklahoma, where he teaches constitutional history.  While at Princeton, he’ll be completing his book, The Jewish Founding Father: Alexander Hamilton’s Hidden Life (under contract with Harvard University Press).  His previous publications include The Devil Himself: A Tale of Honor, Insanity, and the Birth of Modern America (Oxford University Press, 2016) and John Henry Wigmore and the Rules of Evidence: The Hidden Origins of Modern Law (University of Missouri Press, 2016).  He has received fellowships from the University of Oxford, Yeshiva University, the American Jewish Historical Society, and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. He received his B.A. from Northwestern University, his M.A. from Brown University, and his Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge.

Charles T. Rubin

  • 2017-18 James Madison Program Forbes Visiting Fellow; Professor of Political Science, Duquesne University

Charles T. Rubin, 2017-18 James Madison Program Forbes Visiting Fellow, is Professor of Political Science in the McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts at Duquesne University. Prior to teaching at Duquesne, he taught at Kenyon College. He was the 2014-15 Garwood Visiting Professor and Visiting Fellow in the James Madison Program at Princeton University. His recent publications focus on converging technologies, and those who believe they should be used to redesign humanity. He blogs on these topics at “Futurisms,” and is author of Eclipse of Man: Human Extinction and the Meaning of Progress (Encounter/New Atlantis Books). Professor Rubin is also author of The Green Crusade: Rethinking the Roots of Environmentalism (1994) and editor of Conservation Reconsidered: Nature, Virtue and American Liberal Democracy (2000). He is currently finishing a book that explores what classic stories about human created monsters tell us about the coming age of biotechnology. He received his B.A. in Political Science and Philosophy from Case-Western Reserve University, and his Ph.D. from Boston College.

Matthew Slaboch

  • 2017-18 James Madison Program Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Matthew Slaboch is 2017-18 James Madison Program Postdoctoral Research Fellow. His principal areas of expertise and teaching are in political theory and comparative politics. In A Road to Nowhere, his forthcoming book from the University of Pennsylvania Press, he utilizes a comparative-historical approach to explore critiques of the idea of progress. Interdisciplinary in nature, Dr. Slaboch’s work brings into conversation such diverse figures as the German philosophers Arthur Schopenhauer and Oswald Spengler, the Russian novelists Leo Tolstoy and Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, and the American historians Henry Adams and Christopher Lasch. He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Indiana University, a M.A. in Political Science from the University of Kansas, and a B.A. in Political Science from the University of Illinois.

Carl R. Trueman

  • 2017-18 James Madison Program William E. Simon Visiting Fellow in Religion and Public Life; Paul Woolley Professor of Church History, Westminster Theological Seminary

Carl R. Trueman, 2017-18 James Madison Program William E. Simon Visiting Fellow in Religion and Public Life, holds the Paul Woolley Professor of Church History at Westminster Theological Seminary.  He previously served on faculty at the Universities of Nottingham and Aberdeen. His academic interests have focused on sixteenth and seventeenth century intellectual history and his work in this field has been published in volumes from Oxford University Press, Cambridge University Press, Brill, Vandenhoeck and Ruprecht, the International Journal of Systematic Theology and other scholarly organs. He has more recently moved to focus upon historical issues surrounding the development of notions of human personhood as they connect to the development of current social mores and identity politics.  His writings on this topic appear regularly at firstthings.com. He holds a M.A. from the Universities of Cambridge and a Ph.D. from Aberdeen.

David L. Tubbs *01

  • 2017-18 James Madison Program Ann and Herbert W. Vaughan Visiting Fellow; Associate Professor of Politics, The King’s College, NY

David L. Tubbs *01, 2017-18 James Madison Program Ann and Herbert W. Vaughan Visiting Fellow, is Associate Professor of Politics at The King’s College in New York City, where he has been teaching since 2005. He was Visiting Faculty Fellow at Irkutsk State University in Irkutsk, Russia, in 2002-03 and the W.H. Brady Visiting Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute in 2003-04. His scholarship focuses on topics in constitutional law, political theory, and public policy.  He is the author of Freedom’s Orphans (Princeton University Press, 2007), and several scholarly articles, including a forthcoming article written with Jacqueline S. Smith in the Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy on the regulation of pornography under the Constitution.  His shorter articles and reviews have appeared in publications such as the Los Angeles Times, First Things, City Journal, The New Criterion, The American Spectator, and Public Discourse.  He earned his Ph.D. in the Department of Politics at Princeton in 2001.

Kevin G. Vance

  • 2017-18 James Madison Program Forbes Postdoctoral Research Associate

Kevin G. Vance is a 2017-18 James Madison Program Forbes Postdoctoral Research Associate. He received his M.A. from the University of Notre Dame and is Ph.D. candidate in political science at Notre Dame. His dissertation compares the religion clauses jurisprudence of the U.S. Supreme Court with the religious liberty jurisprudence of the Federal Constitutional Court of Germany. He has taught courses in constitutional law and political theory. His other research interests include American political thought, constitutional interpretation, comparative & American constitutional law, Church & State, and judicial politics. Before going to Notre Dame, he received his B.A. in government from Claremont McKenna College and worked in political journalism for several years in Washington, D.C.

John D. Wilsey

  • 2017-18 James Madison Program William E. Simon Visiting Fellow in Religion and Public Life; Associate Professor of Church History, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

John D. Wilsey, 2017-18 James Madison Program William E. Simon Visiting Fellow in Religion and Public Life, is Associate Professor of Church History at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. He serves as Affiliate Scholar in Theology and History at the Acton Institute for the Study of Religion and Liberty. He is the author of two books on the history and theology American religious nationalism, including One Nation Under God: An Evangelical Critique of Christian America (Wipf & Stock, 2011) and American Exceptionalism and Civil Religion: Reassessing the History of an Idea (IVP Academic, 2015). He is also editor of an abridged version of Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America, entitled Democracy in America: A New Abridgement for Students (Lexham, 2016). He is currently researching and writing a religious biography of John Foster Dulles for Eerdmans’ Library of Religious Biography series. He holds a Ph.D. from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.