Hamilton versus Jefferson in the Washington Administration: The Challenge of Foreign Policy

An America’s Founding and Future Lecture

February 24, 2016
Holloway Lecture Poster

Carson Holloway, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Nebraska at Omaha

This lecture examines the differences that emerged between Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson as they advised President George Washington on the crisis caused by the war in Europe arising from the French Revolution.  Particular attention will be paid to their arguments over the meaning of the Constitution, the obligations of treaties, the right of revolution, and the role of morality in politics. 

Carson Holloway is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, where he has taught since 2002. He is the author of Hamilton versus Jefferson in the Washington Administration: Completing the Founding or Betraying the Founding (Cambridge University Press), The Way of Life: John Paul II and the Challenge of Liberal Modernity (Baylor University Press), The Right Darwin? Evolution, Religion, and the Future of Democracy (Spence Publishing), and All Shook Up: Music, Passion and Politics (Spence Publishing).  He was Visiting Fellow in American Political Thought in the Heritage Foundation’s B. Kenneth Simon Center for Principles and Politics in 2014-15, and in 2005-06 he was a William E. Simon Visiting Fellow in Religion and Public Life of the James Madison Program at Princeton University. He received a BA in political science from the University of Northern Iowa in 1991 and a PhD in political science from Northern Illinois University in 1998.

Video:

Hamilton versus Jefferson in the Washington Administration: The Challenge of Foreign Policy

Location:

Lewis Library 120

Photo Album:

  • Carson Holloway on Hamilton versus Jefferson
  • Carson Holloway on Hamilton versus Jefferson
  • Carson Holloway on Hamilton versus Jefferson