Mixing Metaphors: A New Way of Thinking About Grand Strategy

An America’s Founding and Future Lecture

May 7, 2014
Gaddis event poster

John GaddisRobert A. Lovett Professor of Military and Naval History, Yale University

We’re told, in writing and speaking, not to mix metaphors; but we mix metaphors in our thinking all the time.  In his lecture, Professor Gaddis will explore this paradox, with particular reference to what’s missing in the ways that we write, speak, and think about grand strategy.

John Lewis Gaddis is Robert A. Lovett Professor of History and Director of the Brady-Johnson Program in Grand Strategy at Yale University, where he teaches Cold War history, grand strategy, biography, and historical methods.  He has also taught at Ohio University, the United States Naval War College, the University of Helsinki, Princeton University, and Oxford University.  His most recent books include The Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past (2002), Surprise, Security, and the American Experience (2004), The Cold War: A New History (2005), a new edition of Strategies of Containment: A Critical Appraisal of Postwar American National Security Policy (2005), and George F. Kennan: An American Life (2011).  Professor Gaddis has received two awards for undergraduate teaching at Yale, was a 2005 recipient of the National Humanities Medal, and was a 2012 winner of the Pulitzer Prize for the Kennan biography.  He received his BA, MA, and PhD from the University of Texas at Austin.

Video:

Mixing Metaphors: A New Way of Thinking About Grand Strategy

Location:

Lewis Library 120

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