Current Visiting Fellows

Keegan Callanan

  • 2020-2021 Forbes Visiting Fellow; Associate Professor of Political Science, Middlebury College

Keegan Callanan, 2020-21 Forbes Visiting Fellow, is Associate Professor of Political Science at Middlebury College, where he teaches the history of political philosophy and contemporary political theory. His primary research is in modern political thought, democratic theory, and the origins of American institutions. He is author of Montesquieu's Liberalism and the Problem of Universal Politics (Cambridge, 2018) and co-editor of The Cambridge Companion to Montesquieu (under contract, Cambridge). His current research focuses on Alexis de Tocqueville and liberal political theory. His writing has appeared in publications such as History of Political Thought, Political Research Quarterly, and the Wall Street Journal.

Mr. Callanan has held visiting fellowships at Princeton University's James Madison Program and at the University of Virginia. He is founding director of the Alexander Hamilton Forum at Middlebury and a member of the National Council on the Humanities. A graduate of Bowdoin College, Mr. Callanan received his M.A. and Ph.D. from Duke University.  

Adam M. Carrington

  • 2020-2021 Visiting Fellow; Associate Professor of Politics, Hillsdale College

Adam M. Carrington, 2020-2021 James Madison Program Visiting Fellow, is an Associate Professor of Politics at Hillsdale College. At Hillsdale he teaches courses on Constitutional law, the American presidency, Politics and Literature, and Montesquieu. He has won several teaching awards at the College, including “Professor of the Year” as selected by Hillsdale’s graduating class of 2018.  

Carrington’s primary research focuses on the theory and practice of separation of powers, particularly as viewed from the American judiciary. His scholarly articles have appeared in Presidential Studies Quarterly, American Political Thought, and American Journal of Legal History, among others. He has placed shorter pieces in publications such as The Wall Street Journal, The Hill, Washington Examiner, and Public Discourse. His first book, on the jurisprudence of Supreme Court Justice Stephen Field, was published in 2017.  

At Princeton, Carrington is working on a new book manuscript. It examines how federal judges in the early Republic understood the judicial power as different from other governmental functions. It also dives into the debates regarding those distinctions in practice in order to better understand current discourse on the place of public administration.  

Prior to teaching at Hillsdale, Carrington graduated summa cum laude from Ashland University, where he participated in the Ashbrook Scholar Program. He then received his M.A. and Ph.D. from Baylor University, where he won the Richard. D. Huff Outstanding Graduate Student award in the Political Science Department.  

Christopher-Marcus (Marcus) Gibson *19

  • 2020-2021 John and Daria Barry Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Christopher-Marcus (Marcus) Gibson is a 2020-2021 John and Daria Barry Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the James Madison Program at Princeton University.  He received a B.A. in Philosophy and Ancient Greek from Duke University, summa cum laude, and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the Program in Classical Philosophy in the Department of Philosophy at Princeton University. He has taught courses in ancient philosophy at Princeton University and Rutgers University. His research focuses primarily on Greek philosophy, especially the works of Aristotle, as well as on Aristotelian approaches to action, reason, and emotion.  His current work includes a book project on self-controlled character in Aristotle as well as a paper on the good of perfected passions in Aquinas’s account of the well-lived human life.  This fall, he will be teaching a freshman seminar at Princeton University on happiness and human nature in Catholic thought.     

Amanda Greene

  • 2020-21 Visiting Fellow; Assistant Professor of Philosophy, University College London

Amanda Greene, 2020-2021 James Madison Program Visiting Fellow, is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in the Department of Philosophy at University College London. At UCL she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in legal and political philosophy, and contributes to the core courses in the Politics, Philosophy, and Economics degree and the European Social and Political Studies degree. Her research examines the nature of legitimate political authority, especially as it relates to democracy and political realism. She also writes about free speech, human rights, the morality of markets, and Plato’s political philosophy. Her current research project is a book manuscript entitled Legitimacy: The Morality of Power in Politics, Business, and Civil Society. 

She received her Ph.D. at Stanford University, M.Phil. at Oxford University, and B.A. at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has held research fellowships at the University of Chicago Law School, Columbia University, Princeton University's Center for Human Values, and the Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies in Geneva. Before entering academia, she worked as a strategy consultant for the Boston Consulting Group. She also worked as a development advisor for social sector organizations in India and Australia.

Heather E. Heying

  • 2020-2021 Visiting Fellow

Heather E. Heying, 2020-2021 James Madison Program Visiting Fellow, is a founder and chief architect of the Beringia Project, which aims to build a uniquely generative, robust, and creative school for college-age students. She was a professor at The Evergreen State College for 15 years. She and her husband, Bret Weinstein, resigned in the wake of 2017 campus riots that focused in part on Weinstein and Heying's opposition to a day of racial segregation and other college “equity” proposals.

Her scholarly research has focused on the evolution of social systems and behavior, including territoriality, mating systems, and parental care, and has been published in Animal BehaviourProceedings of the Royal Society, and the Journal of Zoology. Her book, Antipode, about research, culture, and wildlife in Madagascar, was published by St. Martin’s Press. She has also written and spoken on modern risks to higher education (in the Wall Street Journal, Public DiscourseAcademic Questions), the value of risk and wild nature (New York Times), and women, science, and feminism (QuilletteAreo).

She earned a Ph.D. in Biology from the University of Michigan, where she was given the Distinguished Dissertation Award, and a B.A. in Anthropology from UCSC. While at Princeton, she and Dr. Weinstein will be conducting research for their forthcoming book, which will provide an evolutionary toolkit for understanding humans, and address issues ranging from childhood and relationships to learning and how to build a better society.

Thomas D. Howes

  • 2020-2021 Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate

Thomas D. Howes is a 2020-2021 Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate in the James Madison Program. His doctoral dissertation explores the topic of religion as a basic human good. It is primarily a work of political ethics aimed at defending special legal protection of religious freedom, but also covers a broad range of philosophical themes in the fields of ethics, epistemology, and the philosophy of religion. At Princeton, he will continue the research that began with his dissertation, with a special focus on the political-ethical foundations of religious liberty. His other academic interests include political philosophy and political economy. 

He holds an M.A. and Ph.D. in Philosophy from The Catholic University of America, an S.T.B. from the Pontifical University of the Holy Cross, and a B.A. in Philosophy from Saint Mary's University of Minnesota.

Daniel J. Mahoney

  • 2020-2021 Garwood Visiting Fellow; Augustine Chair in Distinguished Scholarship, Assumption University

Daniel J. Mahoney, 2020-2021 Garwood Visiting Fellow, holds the Augustine Chair in Distinguished Scholarship at Assumption University in Worcester, MA where he has taught since 1986. His work has centered around the study of French conservative liberal thought from Tocqueville to Raymond Aron, anti-totalitarian writing and thought, especially that of Solzhenitsyn, the study of statesmanship, and reflections on the intersection of religion and politics. He has written and edited over a dozen books, including works on Raymond Aron, Charles de Gaulle, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, and Bertrand de Jouvenel, and on conservatism and liberalism. His most recent book, The Idol of Our Age: How the Religion of Humanity Subverts Christianity, has recently been released in paperback by Encounter Books. His 2014 book, The Other Solzhenitsyn: Telling the Truth About a Misunderstood Writer and Thinker, will be released in paperback by St. Augustine’s Press in the fall of 2020. He has also edited and introduced writings and books by Raymond Aron, Aurel Kolnai, Bertrand de Jouvenel, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, and Pierre Manent.

Mahoney is presently working on two books: The Statesman as Thinker: Ten Portraits of Greatness, Courage, and Moderation, to be published by Encounter Books; and Politics, Civilization, and the Soul: Essays on Pierre Manent and Roger Scruton, to be published by St. Augustine’s Press. 

Mahoney is executive editor of Perspectives on Political Science. He writes regularly for The Claremont Review of Books, Liberty and Law, National Review, The New Criterion, City Journal, Commentaire, the Hungarian Review, Catholic World Report, and First Things.   
 

Colleen E. Mitchell

  • 2020-2021 John and Daria Barry Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Colleen E. Mitchell is a 2020-2021 John and Daria Barry Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the James Madison Program. She is a scholar of the history of political thought, particularly the ancient, medieval, and early modern periods. Her research broadly focuses on the themes of politics and religion, morality, and empire. Her other research and teaching interests include American political thought, constitutional interpretation, feminist political thought, and politics and literature. While at Princeton, Colleen hopes to complete her first book project, in which she examines the treatment of Rome in the writings of Augustine and Machiavelli to understand each thinker’s approach to imperfect politics.

Colleen previously served as an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Notre Dame, where she received her Ph.D. in Political Science in 2019. She also holds a B.A. in English literature from Loyola University Maryland.

Alan Mittleman

  • 2020-2021 Visiting Fellow; Aaron Rabinowitz and Simon H. Rifkind Chair of Jewish Philosophy, Jewish Theological Seminary

Alan Mittleman, 2020-2021 James Madison Program Visiting Fellow, holds the Aaron Rabinowitz and Simon H. Rifkind Chair of Jewish Philosophy at the Jewish Theological Seminary in Manhattan. He has taught at JTS since 2004, prior to which he was Professor of Religion and Jewish Studies at Muhlenberg College, in Allentown, PA. He works in the areas of Jewish ethics, Jewish political thought, and philosophy of religion. Mittleman is the author of seven books. His most recent work, Does Judaism Condone Violence? Holiness and Ethics in the Jewish Tradition (Princeton University Press, 2018), won the National Jewish Book Award in the field of Modern Jewish Thought and Experience in 2019. While at the Madison Program, Mittleman will work on a book tentatively titled Traces of the Absurd: Nihilism, Meaning, and Jewish Thought. The book is an exploration of the concepts of absurdity, nihilism, and the meaning of life both in the contemporary philosophical literature and in the history of Jewish thought. Mittleman holds a B.A. in Religious Studies from Brandeis University and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Religious Studies from Temple University. He is as well a rabbi who worked, before embarking on an academic career in 1988, both in congregational settings and in Jewish organizations.

Jasmina Nedevska

  • 2020-2021 Postdoctoral Research Associate
Bobst Hall 302

Jasmina Nedevska is a 2020-2021 James Madison Program Postdoctoral Research Associate. She comes to us from Mälardalen University in Sweden and a position as Senior Lecturer in Political Science at the School of Business, Society, and Engineering. Her teaching and research are in the fields of political theory, legal theory and environmental ethics.

She holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Stockholm University and a B.A. and M.A. in Political Science from Uppsala University, Sweden. Her dissertation, entitled “Why Care About Future People’s Environment? Approaches to Non-Identity in Contractualism and Natural Law,” was nominated for the 2019 Högskoleföreningen’s Award for outstanding scientific achievement. At the James Madison Program, she is transforming her thesis into articles for publication, while exploring new research ground in the field of climate change litigation.

Ethan Schrum

  • 2020-2021 John and Daria Barry Visiting Research Scholar; Associate Professor of History, Azusa Pacific University

Ethan Schrum, a 2020–2021 John and Daria Barry Visiting Research Scholar in the James Madison Program, is associate professor of history at Azusa Pacific University. He teaches courses in modern U.S. history, U.S. foreign relations, and American intellectual history. As a faculty fellow in APU’s Honors College, he also teaches great works courses on American democracy and on key thinkers of the long twentieth century from Dostoevsky to John Paul II. He served on the steering committee of APU’s Faculty Senate in 2018-19 and on APU’s Strategic Planning Leadership Team in 2019-20. Professor Schrum holds a Ph.D. in history from the University of Pennsylvania and has been a postdoctoral and associate fellow of the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture at the University of Virginia.

A specialist in modern American intellectual history, Professor Schrum has concentrated his scholarship on twentieth century thought and the role of the university in American society. He is the author of The Instrumental University: Education in Service of the National Agenda after World War II (Cornell University Press, 2019), and has published articles on the history of American universities in The Hedgehog Review, History of Education QuarterlyThe Pennsylvania Magazine of History and BiographyPerspectives on the History of Higher Education, and Social Science History, as well as op-ed pieces in The Houston Chronicle and The Richmond Times-Dispatch. He serves as co-chair of the higher education affinity group for the History of Education Society.

At Princeton, Professor Schrum will work on his book project, How Christians Invented Secularism. It examines how leading thinkers from three Christian traditions that were often mutually antagonistic—Catholics, evangelical Protestants, and mainline Protestants—developed ideas about how a new force they called “secularism” was shaping American society from the 1920s onward. He will trace this story through the 1950s, with its prominent national movements concerning religion and higher education, when the concept of the secular university became widespread.

Benjamin Schvarcz

  • 2020-2021 Postdoctoral Research Associate

Benjamin Schvarcz is a 2020-2021 Postdoctoral Research Associate in the James Madison Program. His research focuses on the history of political thought, and more specifically, Jewish political thought in two distinct realms: rabbinic literature of late antiquity and modern Israel. Benjamin’s work has been published, among others, in Harvard Theological Review and The University of Toronto Journal of Jewish Thought. He is currently working on different projects, among them: conceptualizing the life of a city as partnership in rabbinic texts; assessing the role of friendship as a social virtue in rabbinic law; and an intellectual history of the first Israeli political science department. At the Madison Program Benjamin will be working on his book manuscript, entitled A Rabbinic City: Political Thought in Imaginations of Jerusalem, which analyzes the mutual relationships between theology and politics in rabbinic imaginations of Jerusalem’s past and future. In the Spring he will be teaching a freshman seminar on the idea of monarchy in Jewish political thought.

Benjamin holds a Ph.D. and M.A. in Political Science from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and a B.A. in Political Science and Public Communication from Bar-Ilan University. He has previously held positions at the Tikvah Fellowship in New York, the Israel Democracy Institute in Jerusalem, the Kohelet Policy Forum, and the Levinsky College in Tel Aviv. He is the host of the Hebrew podcast ‘HaShamran.’

Bret Weinstein

  • 2020-2021 Visiting Fellow

Bret Weinstein, 2020-2021 James Madison Program Visiting Fellow, is a founder and chief architect of the Beringia Project, which aims to build a uniquely generative, robust, and creative school for college-age students. He was a professor at The Evergreen State College for 14 years. He and his wife, Heather Heying, resigned in the wake of 2017 campus riots that focused in part on Weinstein and Heying's opposition to a day of racial segregation and other college “equity” proposals.

His scholarly research is focused on evolutionary trade-offs. He has worked on the evolution of senescence and cancer, species diversity gradients, and the adaptive significance of human morality and religion. He has written for The Wall Street Journal and testified to the U.S. Congress regarding questions of freedom of expression on college campuses. He is currently the host of Bret Weinstein’s DarkHorse Podcast.

Dr. Weinstein earned a Ph.D. in Biology from the University of Michigan, where he was given the Don Tinkle Award for distinguished work in Evolutionary Ecology, and he earned a B.A. in Biology from UCSC. While at Princeton, he and Heather will be conducting research for their forthcoming book, which will provide an evolutionary toolkit for understanding humans, and address issues ranging from childhood and relationships to learning and how to build a better society.

Jacob Wolf

  • 2020-2021 John and Daria Barry Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Jacob Wolf is a 2020-2021 John and Daria Barry Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the James Madison Program.  His research interests include the theological origins of modern politics and the political origins of modern theology.  His dissertation, Harmonizing Heaven and Earth: Democratization and Individualism in American Religion, studied the growth and evolution of individualism in the United States and how a shifting conception of the self has contributed to the recent decline of organized religion and brought about significant changes in the nature of American religious institutions.  At Princeton, he will convert his dissertation into a book manuscript.  He will also continue his study of the correspondence between Alexis de Tocqueville and Arthur de Gobineau, for the insight it lends into the dark side of the enlightenment which seems to have taken root in both the far left and far right of American politics.

He received his Ph.D. in Political Science from Boston College, with a double-concentration in Political Theory and American Politics, and he received his B.A. in History from University of Northwestern - St. Paul.  He was awarded Boston College’s Donald J. White Teaching Excellence Award in 2019.  He was also a 2019-2020 Richard Weaver Fellow of the Intercollegiate Studies Institute. 

Jonathan Yudelman

  • 2020-2021 Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate

Jonathan Yudelman is a 2020-2021 Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate in the James Madison Program. He is currently preparing a book on the seventeenth and eighteenth century origins of the liberal theory of progress in the works of Hobbes, Giambattista Vico, and Kant. This work addresses contemporary setbacks in the global spread of the liberal creed, and proposes how current domestic challenges to the principle of liberal government might be understood in terms of the theory of progress itself. His other ongoing research projects include a study of John Selden’s theory of natural law, and preparation of the first English translation, from Hebrew and Latin, of Averroes’ commentary on Book V of Aristotle’s Ethics.

He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Boston College, where he received the Engelhard Pingree Award in 2019, awarded to the graduate student whose work has made the greatest contribution to the research mission of the Graduate school. He also holds an M.A. in Philosophy and a B.A. in Jewish Thought, both from the Hebrew University. In 2019-2020 he served as a Morris and Marilyn Moscowitz Senior Fellow at The Herzl Institute in Jerusalem. His public writing on politics and culture has appeared in publications including First ThingsCity Journal, the LA Review of Books, the American Mind, and others.