Current Visiting Fellows

Stephanie Ahrens

Stephanie M. Ahrens

  • 2021-22 John and Daria Barry Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Stephanie Ahrens is a 2021-2022 John and Daria Barry Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the James Madison Program. Her academic interests lie at the intersection of political theory and American politics, and she primarily draws from ancient and modern political thought, democratic theory, American political thought and development, and quantitative social science in her normative and interpretive research. In particular, her work focuses on community in democracy and the normative aspects of political relationships among members of democracy. While at Princeton, she will finish a book manuscript that responds to ongoing declines in political trust in the United States by defining what trust should look like among members of a democracy, how democratic institutions and practices undercut or support a culture of “democratic trust,” and analyzes whether the Constitution of the United States sets the institutional ground for citizens to democratically trust each other. 

Stephanie earned a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago and a University Scholars B.A. from Baylor University with concentrations in Political Science and Classics.

Jacob Boros

Jacob R. Boros

  • 2021-22 John and Daria Barry Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Jacob Boros is a 2021-2022 John and Daria Barry Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the James Madison Program. Currently, his research focuses on American environmental thought, especially the ideas of the twentieth-century conservationist Aldo Leopold. His dissertation, “Aldo Leopold’s Political Thought: Particularizing American Environmental Dialogue,” examines how Leopold helps Americans with differing perspectives on how and why to protect the natural world talk to one another productively by focusing on particular parts of “the land,” the ecological system humans share with other natural things, as opposed to an abstract “environment.” Jacob will spend his fellowship converting his dissertation into a book manuscript, the first extended study of Leopold as a political thinker. In addition, he will work on a shorter study of the British geographer Halford J. Mackinder’s relationship with the realist tradition. These two projects share a focus on the connection between physical space and political life, which informs Jacob’s broader specialties in American political thought and international politics.

Jacob earned his M.A. and Ph.D., both in Political Science, from Baylor University, where he was a Presidential Scholar. He received his B.A. in History and Politics from Saint Vincent College.

Keegan Callanan

Keegan Callanan

  • 2021-22 Forbes Visiting Research Collaborator; Associate Professor of Political Science, Middlebury College

Keegan Callanan, 2021-22 Forbes Visiting Research Collaborator, is Associate Professor of Political Science at Middlebury College, where he teaches the history of political philosophy and contemporary political theory. His primary research is in modern political thought, democratic theory, and the origins of American institutions. He is author of Montesquieu's Liberalism and the Problem of Universal Politics (Cambridge, 2018) and co-editor of The Cambridge Companion to Montesquieu (under contract, Cambridge). His current research focuses on Alexis de Tocqueville and liberal political theory. His writing has appeared in publications such as History of Political Thought, Political Research Quarterly, and the Wall Street Journal.

Mr. Callanan has held visiting fellowships at Princeton University's James Madison Program and at the University of Virginia. He is founding director of the Alexander Hamilton Forum at Middlebury and a member of the National Council on the Humanities. A graduate of Bowdoin College, Mr. Callanan received his M.A. and Ph.D. from Duke University.  

Kyu-Been Chun

Kyu-Been Chun

  • 2021-22 Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate

Kyu-Been Chun is a 2021-22 Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate in the James Madison Program. His research focuses on the topic of practical reason. His dissertation examined Aristotle’s practical reason and how perception and desire influence the reasoning process. At Princeton, he will develop his dissertation to examine further the relationship between perception of equality and factional conflict in Aristotle’s Politics. His other research interest includes American political thought, specifically 19th-century American political thought on equality. He has taught courses on American politics and political philosophy at Azusa Pacific University and California State University, Los Angeles.

 He received M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science (Political Philosophy and American Politics) from Claremont Graduate University and a B.A. in Philosophy from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. 

Emily Finley

Emily Finley

  • 2021-22 John and Daria Barry Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Emily Finley is a 2021-22 John and Daria Barry Postdoctoral Fellow in the James Madison Program. Her research focuses on the direct and indirect influence of Jean-Jacques Rousseau on Catholic social and political thought. In particular, it examines the origins and character of a Rousseauean moral-ethical sensibility on modern Catholic thought and assesses the degree to which this new ethic is in keeping with the older Augustinian and Thomistic Catholic traditions. She received her Ph.D. in Politics from The Catholic University of America.

Solveig Gold

Solveig L. Gold '17

  • 2021-22 Senior Research Assistant

Solveig Lucia Gold ’17 is a 2021–2022 Senior Research Assistant in the James Madison Program. Her dissertation traces two ideas that run through Plato’s thought, “slavery to the laws” and “slavery to the gods,” revealing intersections between the philosopher’s theology and political theory; more broadly, she is interested in unpacking the myths, metaphors, and murk of the Platonic corpus. At the Madison Program, she will be researching the centrality of marriage laws in Plato’s Laws, as well as working on a book on the state of the field of Classics.

A native New Yorker, Solveig received her A.B. in Classics from Princeton University, summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa, and was co-winner of the Moses Taylor Pyne Prize, the highest general distinction Princeton confers on an undergraduate. She received an MPhil with distinction in Classics from the University of Cambridge, where she is also currently a PhD candidate. She has published articles in Classical Quarterly, First Things, the Human Life Review, the New Criterion, Quillette, and the Spectator, and she is co-author, with her grandfather, Robert W. Jenson, of Conversations with Poppi: An Eight-Year-Old and Her Theologian Grandfather Trade Questions, published by Brazos Press and subsequently translated into Korean, Mandarin, and Arabic.

Portrait of Amanda Greene smiling in front of a blue banner

Amanda Greene

  • Fall 2021 Visiting Research Scholar; Associate Professor of Philosophy, University College London

Amanda Greene, Fall 2021 Visiting Research Scholar, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy at University College London. At UCL she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in legal and political philosophy, and contributes to the core courses in the Politics, Philosophy, and Economics degree and the European Social and Political Studies degree. Her research examines the nature of legitimate political authority, especially as it relates to democracy and political realism. She also writes about free speech, human rights, the morality of markets, and Plato’s political philosophy. Her current research project is a book manuscript entitled Legitimacy: The Morality of Power in Politics, Business, and Civil Society. 

She received her Ph.D. at Stanford University, M.Phil. at Oxford University, and B.A. at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has held research fellowships at the University of Chicago Law School, Columbia University, Princeton University's Center for Human Values, and the Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies in Geneva. Before entering academia, she worked as a strategy consultant for the Boston Consulting Group. She also worked as a development advisor for social sector organizations in India and Australia.

Nasser Hussain

Nasser Hussain

  • 2021-22 Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate

Nasser Hussain is a 2021-2022 Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate in the James Madison Program and Lecturer in Politics at Princeton University. A graduate of Harvard College, where he majored in government, Nasser received his Ph.D. in anthropology from Columbia University. His doctoral dissertation, an immigration epic, engaged Alasdair MacIntyre’s virtue ethics in exploring the connection between faith and work in the building of a religious community. His broader research lies at the intersection of religion, ethics and politics.

Nasser’s wide-ranging scholarly endeavors have received notable awards and distinctions. The Volvo Research & Educational Foundation sponsored his project on the disruptive potential of technology in the American urban landscape, especially in relation to community life, mobility and access. At Harvard, he received a South Asia Initiative research award for his study on social movements, while at Columbia his teaching excellence was acknowledged through a Kluge fellowship. He has received numerous research fellowships as a visiting scholar at the London School of Economics, the Earth Institute, the Kennedy School of Government and Chatham House, where he published a report on the politics of the European Union.

Beyond these academic pursuits, Nasser has worked in the British Parliament, a major international newspaper and a Fortune 500 company. A passionate educator, he has taught and mentored students across three continents. At Princeton, Nasser teaches the freshman seminar, American Identity at a Crossroads? The course covers the major debates in contemporary American culture, themes that he will explore in his postdoctoral project.

Peter Koritansky

Peter K. Koritansky

  • 2021-22 John and Daria Barry Visiting Research Scholar; Professor of History, Philosophy, and Religious Studies, University of Prince Edward Island (Canada)

Peter Karl Koritansky, 2021-2022 James Madison Program Visiting Fellow, is a Professor of History, Philosophy, and Religious Studies at The University of Prince Edward Island in Charlottetown, Canada. At UPEI, he teaches courses in ancient and medieval philosophy, moral and political philosophy, and philosophy of law. He has also taught at Malone University (Canton, OH), Walsh University (North Canton, OH), the Ateneo Pontificio Regina Apostolorum (Rome) and has been a visiting scholar at The University of Notre Dame. Dr. Koritansky received his Ph.D in philosophy from The University of Toronto and is the author of Thomas Aquinas and the Philosophy of Punishment (CUA Press, 2012) and Engaging the Skeptic: Essays Addressing the Modern Secularist’s Most Serious Objections to the Catholic Worldview (Justin Press, 2018). He has also recently published “Thomas Aquinas and the Euthyphro Dilemma” (Heythrop Journal, 2018) and “Retributive Justice and Natural Law” (The Thomist, 2019). During his fellowship with the James Madison Program, he will be completing a manuscript tentatively entitled An Introduction to Thomistic Natural Law.  

Angus McClellan

Angus McClellan

  • 2021-22 Garwood Postdoctoral Research Associate

Angus K. McClellan is a 2021-22 Garwood Postdoctoral Research Associate in the James Madison Program. His doctoral dissertation explores the jurisprudence of 19th-century judge and treatise-writer Thomas M. Cooley, a largely forgotten jurist who was once the most cited authority in all of state and federal case law. It is primarily a work demonstrating the soundness of Cooley’s constitutional principles, particularly those that impose implied limitations on the powers of American legislatures. Long-recognized in English and American case law and legal treatises, these principles are housed within the express limitations of the written American constitutions, and they include prohibitions on class legislation, public spending for private use, retroactive civil legislation, and others that were intended to secure broad spheres of individual liberty and the right to property. While at Princeton, McClellan will continue his work on Cooley and explore the degree to which modern state governments can encourage civic virtue while remaining within the confines of these limitations that rest upon the power of American legislatures. His other academic interests include political philosophy and American political thought.

He holds an M.A. in Politics and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Claremont Graduate University as well as a B.A. in Political Science from Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia.

Allen Porter

Allen Porter '10

  • 2021-22 John and Daria Barry Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Allen Porter is a 2021-2022 John and Daria Barry Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the James Madison Program. The two main focuses of his current research are bioethics and political philosophy. His dissertation, “Social Justice Leftism as Deconstructive Postmodernism”, offers a unified explanation of a number of novel phenomena associated with what is now commonly called “the woke left”—including the use of various techniques of “silencing” (such as “deplatforming”), calls by students for racially segregated campus spaces, the new rhetoric of “equity”, “microaggression” complaints and demands for “safe spaces”, and more. His thesis is that the existence and features of these phenomena are straightforwardly predictable in light of their underlying political ideology, which results from combining philosophical postmodernism and political leftism—a political ideology which has dominated Western humanities and social science departments for several decades, and which increasingly prevails outside of academia. At Princeton, he will focus on converting his dissertation into a book. Allen holds a B.A. in German from Princeton University, a M.A. in Philosophy from Tulane University, and a M.A. and Ph.D. in Philosophy from Rice University.

Benjamin Schvarcz

Benjamin Schvarcz

  • 2020-2021 Postdoctoral Research Associate

Benjamin Schvarcz is a 2021-2022 Postdoctoral Research Associate in the James Madison Program. His research focuses on the history of political thought, and more specifically, Jewish political thought in two distinct realms: rabbinic literature of late antiquity and modern Israel. Benjamin’s work has been published, among others, at The Harvard Theological Review and The University of Toronto Journal of Jewish Thought. His article on a political theory of partnership in rabbinic laws of neighbors is forthcoming at the Jewish Quarterly Review. At the Madison Program Benjamin works on different projects, among them: (1) Israel's coalitional politics and ideologies; (2) theological and political strategies in religious peacebuilding campaigns; (3) monarchy in current Jewish political thought; (4) the role of friendship as a social virtue in rabbinic law; and (5) an intellectual history of the first Israeli political science department.

Benjamin holds a Ph.D. and M.A. in Political Science from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and a B.A. in Political Science and Public Communication from Bar-Ilan University. He has previously held positions at the Tikvah Fellowship in New York, the Israel Democracy Institute in Jerusalem, the Kohelet Policy Forum, and the Levinsky College in Tel Aviv.

Stephen Wolfe

Stephen Wolfe

  • 2021-22 Postdoctoral Research Associate

Stephen Wolfe is a 2021-2022 Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the James Madison Program. His doctoral dissertation is on the continuity and discontinuity of American political thought between the Puritan settlements in the 17th century and the American founding in the 18th century. His primary research interest is Protestant political theory. At Princeton, he will prepare his dissertation for publication and begin a project on transatlantic influences on religious toleration in 17th century Puritan New England.

He is a graduate of the United States Military Academy (West Point) and holds an M.A. in philosophy and an M.A. and Ph.D. in political theory from Louisiana State University. He and his wife Megan have four children.